Students Practice Stream Restoration

 

NDSU spent an evening placing rocks in the water near the confluence of the two inlets, under the advice of Natural Resources Management Professor, Jack Norland, PhD

Members of the Natural Resources Management Club and Wildlife Society at NDSU spent an evening placing rocks in the water near the confluence of the two inlets under the advice of Natural Resources Management Professor, Jack Norland, PhD. The World Garden Commons at Rabanus Park is the stormwater pond restoration pilot for The Fargo Project.

Grad student Aaron Green described the effects of the rock and willow riffles he and the MN DNR stream ecology section developed last year.  Today, you can see that the energy created by the rock and willow riffles has induced enough erosion to begin meanders in the stream. By strategically placing rocks essentially narrowing the stream, the students increased the low-flow drop and created a split flow

By strategically placing rocks essentially narrowing the stream, the students increased the low-flow drop and created a split flow. Now, during future high flows after a rain event, the split flow should create enough energy in the stream for a sediment-free pool beyond. An added benefit is a beautiful feature of rocks and running water mimicking natural prairie streams and rivers of our region.

NDSU NRM & Wildlife Students create a water feature

The Natural Resources Management Club and Wildlife Society at NDSU spend club time dedicated to outdoor education and resource management, learning about our environment and becoming more involved with wildlife or wildlife related organizations in the area.

 

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